Praying for Those Fallen Asleep in the Lord

15 Feb
Koliva!

Koliva!

In the New Testament we find a gentle phrase referring to Christians who have died: St. Paul, in his Letter to the Thessalonians, calls them “those who have fallen asleep in the Lord.” The phrase comes from a passage describing the end of the world and foretelling what will happen to us Christians, both living and dead, when our Lord Jesus Christ returns in His glory:

“According to the Lord’s word,
we tell you that we who are still alive,
who are left until the coming of the Lord, will certainly not precede those who have fallen asleep.
For the Lord himself will come down from heaven,
with a loud command, with the voice of the archangel
and with the trumpet call of God,
and the dead in Christ will rise first.
After that, we who are still alive and are left will be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air.
And so we will be with the Lord forever.” (I Thessalonians 4:15-17)

This biblical passage is jam-packed with information about the afterlife and our future life as Christians. First of all, this passage informs us that our loved ones who have died, if they have believed in Christ Jesus, are not gone for good; they are still with the Lord, and they will awake to new life and will rise again at the Coming of Jesus. Second, this passage tells us that we Christians who are alive will be joined again with our departed loved ones. Then we all shall be with the Lord…together and forever.

What joyous news!

As we approach the season of Great Lent in anticipation of celebrating our Lord’s Passion, Death, and Resurrection, we set aside a few special days to remember and pray for our loved ones who have “fallen asleep.” On one Saturday just before Lent starts, and on three Saturdays during Lent, we sing special petitions on their behalf and we remember them all by name. These “Memorial Saturdays” remind us that our loved ones, though dead physically, are alive in Christ.

searchOn these “Memorial Saturdays,” some Orthodox Christians have another special custom. Following the end of Divine Liturgy and the reception of Holy Communion, the priest blesses a special dish called “koliva,” which contains wheat berries, nuts, and honey. The sprouted wheat is a sign of resurrected life (John 12:24), and the honey is a reminder of the sweetness of God’s Kingdom.

Many people ask us Orthodox Christians: “Why do you pray for the dead?” Our answer is simple: “We pray for them because they are not dead; they are alive in Christ and they still are part of our community. Just as we who are on earth pray for each other, so we pray for those “fallen asleep in the Lord,” and we know that the saints in the Lord are also praying for us (Revelation 5:88:4). Best of all, someday, all of us “will be with the Lord forever.”

In Him, Father Steven, pastor

P.S. You may listen to my sermon for our first Memorial Saturday, February 14th, titled, “Asleep in the Lord.”

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